Housing with No Citizenship Requirement

  1. Find HUD programs that do not require citizenship documentation.
  2. Find other programs that do not require citizenship documentation.

There are federal programs that do not require you to share documentation of your citizenship or immigration status in order to apply. Because these programs do not require documentation of citizenship, you should also not need to provide a Social Security number.

Some properties built with these programs may also have used funding from other federal programs that do have immigration status restrictions. In that case, persons who are not eligible noncitizens cannot apply. Because a property can have a mix of funding sources, it is best to ask the housing office what programs funded the project.

Option 1: Find HUD programs that do not require citizenship documentation.

  • HUD 221(d)(3), 221(d)(4) and 231 programs. These programs support financing of affordable housing communities serving moderate income households, the elderly and disabled. For background information about the 221(d)(3) and 221(d)(4) programs visit the HUD program page here, and for more information about the 231 program visit the HUD program page here.

  • 811 Housing for Disabled. This program supports housing for disabled people. It provides both interest-free capital advances and operating subsidies to nonprofit developers and project rental assistance to state housing agencies. For information on how to apply, use the search bar at the top of any of Affordable Housing Online’s pages to search for your city, county, or state. Look at the communities shown with the “Section 811” program tag in the gray box, and click the property name to learn more. You may call the toll free phone number provided on the page or submit the online information request form. If these methods of contact are not available on the community’s page, visit the property for more information.

  • Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA). This program supports housing for people living with HIV and AIDS. The support can include rental assistance, chemical dependency treatment, mental health services, job training and placement help and assistance with daily living. For more information about HOPWA visit the HUD program page here.

  • McKinney Homeless Programs. These are programs administered by HUD that serve shelter needs of homeless individuals and families. They primarily support shelter development and operating costs. The programs include Emergency Shelter Grants (ESG), Supportive Housing Program, Supplemental Assistance to Facilities to Assist the Homeless and the Single Family Property Disposition Initiative. One program that supports the rehabilitation and operation of single-room occupancy (SRO) units for homeless people, the Section 8 Moderate Rehab for SRO program, has the same immigration status restrictions as HUD Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance described below. A good description of the McKinney Homeless Programs is provided by the National Alliance to End Homelessness here.

  • Shelter Plus Care. A HUD program supporting the development and operation of housing to help people and families transition out of homelessness. These properties include services to help move people to more stable housing situations. Visit HUD’s program page for Shelter Plus Care information here.

  • HOME Rental Assistance. HOME is a block grant program, with HUD overseeing funds that are sent to state and city housing agencies to support a wide range of affordable housing needs. One use of these funds is for rental assistance.  HOME rental assistance is always used in properties primarily developed with other sources. Some of these funding sources may have eligibility restrictions related to immigration status. You should check with the housing office or manager about other funding associated with the property that may have these kinds of restrictions. For more information, visit HUD’s HOME Rental Assistance page here.

Option 2: Find other programs that do not require citizenship documentation.

  • Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) properties. LIHTC provides tax credits to investors that invest capital in properties that serve low-income households. These properties in many cases include other federal funding sources with immigrant status restrictions, at least for specified apartments in the property. You should check with the housing office or manager about other funding associated with the property that may have these kinds of restrictions. For more information about how the LIHTC program works, see Affordable Housing Online's LIHTC Guide.

  • USDA Section 515 Rural Rental Housing. Section 515 is a program run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) that provides low-interest loans to developers building properties providing apartments to low-income households in rural areas. Although proof of immigration status is not required to apply for a Section 515 apartment, these properties often have other federal subsidies, such as Section 521 Rural Rental Assistance or Section 8 Project-Based Assistance, that have immigrant status restrictions. You should check with the housing office or manager about other funding associated with the property that may have these kinds of restrictions. For information on how to apply, use the search bar at the top of any of Affordable Housing Online’s pages to search for your city, county, or state. Look at the communities shown with the “Section 515” program tag in the gray box, and click the property name to learn more. You may call the toll free phone number provided on the page or submit the online information request form. If these methods of contact are not available on the community’s page, visit the property for more information.

  • In addition, many states have rental programs that serve all people, including undocumented immigrants. To find out which programs run by your state are eligible for all immigrants, you should talk with an immigration attorney, the local legal services office or state housing agency.