Affordable Housing Online is monitoring the federal government's response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. As of March 13, 2020, Public Housing Agencies across the nation are closing their doors to the public. Most offices are still running and will communicate by phone, email, or mail. Some offices have drop boxes installed outside, so documents can still be hand-delivered. Visit the housing authority's website for the latest on its current operations, if one is available. If there is no information online, contact the housing authority directly. Due to a high volume of calls and modified office hours in most areas, expect a long wait time (days or weeks) for a response. To find your local PHA's contact info, browse by state here.

An extensive list of coronavirus resources for low-income households can be found here.

After a Disaster

  1. Keep in contact with your local housing authority or landlord.
  2. Only return to your home once any evacuation notices have been lifted.

Step 1: Keep in contact with your local housing authority or landlord.

Make sure you have the contact information for your housing authority, landlord, property management company, property manager or case worker so you can keep in touch during and after the disaster.

Your housing authority or landlord may already have a system set up for residents to check in after the disaster has occurred. Even if your housing provider does not have this service, send them a message by phone or email. If you have to leave a voicemail message, do so. The housing authority is likely to receive a large volume of messages from residents, so only send multiple messages if there is new information, and be patient in receiving a response.

Step 2: Only return to your home once any evacuation notices have been lifted.

If your home sustained damages in the disaster, take pictures of the unit after the disaster. Keep this proof for FEMA, insurance agencies, your landlord, your housing authority and other organizations.